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Category: David Ortiz Bail Bonds (Page 1 of 137)

What Do Co-Signers Do?

What Do Co-Signers Do?

What Do Co-Signers Do?

When dealing with bail for the first time, you are bound to run into a couple of terms that you don’t understand. One such term might be co-signers. Co-signers are pretty important when posting bail, but the term doesn’t come up much in day to day life. This can leave some people scratching their heads, luckily David Ortiz Bail Bonds in Exeter is here to help out.

Co-signers are people who are willing to sign the contract for the bail bond. These people take responsibility for making sure the payments are made on time and that the person bailed out behaves. If they don’t do that, the person who was bailed out could get re-arrested. Luckily, since there can be multiple co-signers, they can share that responsibility with one another.

Co-signers also help determine what kind of deal a person can get when posting bail. For instance, if a co-signer meets certain requirements, then they can qualify for a 20% discount off the price of the bail bond here at David Ortiz Bail Bonds in Exeter. To qualify, one of the co-signers has to:

  • Be a member of the military.
  • Be be a member of AARP.
  • Be be a member of a union.
  • Be be a homeowner.
  • Have a private attorney.

As long as just one of those requirements is met, you can qualify for the discount.

Some of the other benefits that we provide to our clients include:

  • 24/7 Bail Bond Service
  • FREE Consultation
  • 20% Discount
  • Phone approvals
  • 0% Interest Payment Plans
  • No Hidden Fees
  • No Collateral with Working Co-Signer
  • Se habla Español

As you can see, co-signers are very important when it comes to bail. They can help determine how much has to be paid, and they are responsible for their loved one once bailed out. If you want to know more about bailing someone out of jail, just talk to one of our professional bail agents. They are available 24/7 to assist you.

For a FREE bail bond consultation, call David Ortiz Bail Bonds in Exeter at 1-866-485-6356 or 661-326-0608 or click Talk To An Agent Now to chat.

Visiting Someone In Jail

Visiting Someone In Jail

Visiting Someone In Jail

When a person has been arrested and locked away, it can be hard for them to stay in contact with loved ones. Some people may choose to visit their loved one in jail so there interaction doesn’t have to be as distant as a phone call. While this is a viable option, it is important to remember that you cannot just walk into any jail and ask to visit a loved one.

The exact requirements vary from jail to jail, but there is usually a bit of paperwork required beforehand. In some jail, inmates have to create a list of people who they would like to visit. If someone isn’t on that list, they can’t come in. At many jails, people who want to visit will have to fill out a visitor application. The jail will use this to determine if they will let the person come to visit.

Each jail has its own set of visiting hours, meaning a person can only visit their loved one during those times. Most items can’t be brought into the jail, including things like purses and jewelry. These sort of items are best left inside the car. You should also be prepared to go through a screening process as you enter the jail. Some jails may screen your car as you drive in, and all of them will screen people as they enter. In some rare instances, this could include a strip search.

People will only be granted access to visit if they have a valid government issued ID with them. There are very few items that a person can bring with them inside, these can include:

  • Eyeglasses, for medical reasons
  • ID
  • One car key
  • Small bills or change for vending machines

Just like all of the other rules with inmate visitations, this list can vary from jail to jail. Some jails do provide lockers to store items in while visiting an inmate.

More and more, jails are starting to allow video visitations. With this, the visit is basically a Skype call, where a person can call in from their home. There is less of a screening process with this method and a person doesn’t have to leave the comforts of their own home while still getting to see their loved one’s face.

When visiting someone in jail, don’t expect to be able to walk right in and say hello. There is a whole process and again, it varies from jail to jail. If you want to visit your loved one in jail, be sure to check out the jail’s website for more information on their visiting guidelines.

If you want to bail someone out of jail, contact David Ortiz Bail Bonds in Dinuba at 1-866-485-6356 or 661-326-0608 or click Talk To An Agent Now to chat.

Can You Smoke In Public?

Can You Smoke In Public?

Can You Smoke In Public?

Despite the obvious health concerns that come with smoking, there are still a lot of smokers out there in the world. An estimated 42.1 million people in the United States are smokers. This averages out to roughly 18% of all adults over the age of 18. That is a whole lot of people who still smoke.

The state of California is considered one of the leaders in anti-smoking laws and regulations. If a person violates any of these laws, then they could face fines. This makes it very important for smokers to be aware of all of these laws. A smoker needs to be very careful about where they decide to light up, or they could find themselves in trouble.

You Can’t Smoke Everywhere

Under California law, it is illegal for any person to smoke any tobacco products in an enclosed workplace. This law covers the entire state and cities and counties are not allowed to modify it. This means that is illegal to smoke in any indoor place where people work. This law even applies to people who aren’t employees of the establishment they are currently in, such as patrons at a bar. They may not work there, but other people do, and so they cannot smoke in the bar.

Employers can allow smoking in certain rooms of their building if they ventilate it properly. This means pumping the air in the room directly outside, so as not to harm non-smoking employees. The ventilation system has to meet set state standards.

Hotels and other places that host transient lodging do have some exemptions to this law. Hotels are allowed to permit smoking in up to 65% of their rooms. Up to 25% of the hotel lobby can permit smoking as well. Smoking can be allowed in meeting and banquet halls as long as no food is present in the room.

A general rule of thumb with smoking is that if a non-smoker is present in an area, then a smoker shouldn’t light up. This is because non-smokers have very little to protect themselves from secondhand smoke. This is why the state of California has adopted such strict laws.

A person is caught smoking in a non-smoking area will face a $100 fine for a first-time offense, $200 for a second offense within a year and $500 for a third or subsequent offense within a year.

Cities and counties are also permitted to ban smoking completely within their limits. Smokers should be aware of local smoking ordinances in their city to ensure they don’t get into trouble.

Don’t Litter With Cigarette Butts

Something else for smokers to consider is what they do with their cigarette butts. Despite popular beliefs that cigarette butts are just harmless bits of paper and cotton, they are very harmful to the environment. They contain thousands of chemicals within them, which is why they are considered toxic waste.

Throwing away cigarette butts on the ground is illegal here in California under Penal Code 374. This law makes it illegal to dump waste matter anywhere that isn’t a designated dump. Areas included in this description are:

  • Public and private roads
  • Private property
  • Public parks

The law specifically lists all forms of cigarettes and cigars as types of waste. If a person is caught tossing their cigarette butt onto the ground, they can face infraction charges of illegal dumping. The consequences for this crime are:

  • A fine of $250 to $1,000 for a first-time offense.
  • A fine of $500 to $1,500 for a second-time offense.
  • A fine of $750 to $3,000 for any subsequent offenses.

Be Careful Where You Light Up

Smoking is very unhealthy and a majority of the population chooses not to smoke. As such, they have the right to not breathe in harmful secondhand smoke. This is why smoking is so heavily restricted across the state of California. If a person chooses to smoke, then they need to be aware of both state and local laws. If they aren’t, they could easily earn themselves some nice fines for lighting up in the wrong area or disposing of the cigarette butt on the ground.

What are your thoughts on smoking and California’s laws against smoking?

Should smokers be allowed to light up wherever they want or do you think there should be more restrictions? What about the penalties for smoking in non-smoking areas, are they fair or should they be re-adjusted? Let us know what you think in the comments down below.

 

What Counts As Looting In California?

What Counts As Looting In California?

What Counts As Looting In California?

Whenever an emergency strikes, people are bound to panic. This is only natural as systems that people have been able to rely on for their day to day lives begin to shut down. This is exactly what is happening as the COVID-19 Coronavirus pandemic spreads across the world. In response to this virus, many non-essential systems have been shut down to reduce the spread of the disease.

Combine this with the fact that thousands, if not millions, of people have been panic stockpiling all kinds of resources, making it harder for everyone to get even the essentials, a lot of people are scared. For most people, this just means staying at home and avoiding going into public, which is what everyone should be doing anyway.

Unfortunately, there are people out there that see the deserted shopping centers and decide to use that to their advantage. These people figure that if no one is around to stop them, they can do whatever they want without fear of repercussion. However, that is not the case. Law enforcement agencies are still operating and enforcing the law. If they catch anyone looting, there will be consequences.

California’s Different Looting Laws

California state law defines the act of looting as someone committing second-degree burglary within a county or area that is currently experiencing a state of emergency due to natural or man made disasters. This definition does include the national emergency called in response to the Coronavirus.

The following laws can all be considered looting under California law:

  • Penal Code 459 Burglary
  • Penal Code 484 Petty Theft
  • Penal Code 487 Grand Theft

Burglary is defined as the act of entering a house or any other building with the intent of committing larceny. In other words, burglary is the act of going into a building to steal something. First-degree burglary occurs when a person enters a residential building. Second-degree burglary occurs when a person enters a commercial building.

Petty theft is defined as wrongfully taking someone else’s property that is valued at less than $950. Grand theft is the same, except the value of the items exceeds $950.

The difference between burglary and theft is that burglary is entering a place with the intent to steal something. Theft is the actual act of stealing something. This means that a person may not be charged with theft if they try and fail to steal something, but they could still be charged with burglary for attempting to do so.

The Penalties Of Looting

The penalties for looting are dependent on what particular crime the person committed. When it comes to burglary or grand theft, a person can either be charged with either a misdemeanor or a felony depending on the facts of the case.

Looting by burglary and looting grand theft have the same consequences. When the crimes are charged as misdemeanors, they come with:

  • Up to 1 year in county jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.
  • Misdemeanor probation.
  • Up to 240 hours of community service.

As a felonies, the crimes comes with:

  • 16 months, 2 years or 3 years in county jail.
  • A max fine of $10,000.
  • Felony probation.
  • Up to 240 hours of community service.

Petty theft looting is always a misdemeanor offense and comes with:

  • Up to 6 months in county jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.
  • Misdemeanor probation.
  • Up to 80 hours of community service.

Don’t Be A Looter

Stealing is never a good idea. However, doing it during an emergency is especially horrible. People already have enough problems to deal with during an emergency, such as the spreading of a virus. They shouldn’t have to worry about people looting their homes and stores. This is why the act of looting is illegal, and it is taken very seriously.

What are your thoughts on California’s looting laws and looters in general?

Do you think the laws are enough of a deterrent or should the consequences be more severe? Maybe you think the laws are too harsh as is. Let us know what you think in the comments down below.

 

What Is Price Gouging?

What Is Price Gouging?

What Is Price Gouging?

Anyone who knows about economics and the concept supply and demand knows that as demand goes up and supply struggles to keep up, prices can rise too. The more people want something, and the less of it there is, the more expensive that item becomes. This is something that a lot of people are experiencing as shortages of basic goods abound thanks to the panic caused by the COVID-19 Coronavirus.

As people struggle to get basic necessities, some people are taking advantage of the shortage to make a quick buck. For instance, the prices of hand sanitizer and face masks shot up by roughly 500% on eBay. Similar practices can be found pretty much everywhere due to the virus, and while some people may think it is okay, raising prices like this during an emergency is pretty frowned upon by most people.

Is It Legal?

Here in the state of California, the act of price gouging is made illegal under the Penal Code 396. Under this law, it is illegal for someone to unjustifiably raise the prices of basic goods and services by excessive amounts during a state of emergency. As far as the law is concerned, an excessive amount is 10% or more of a price increase during an emergency compared to the prices before the emergency was declared.

The items that are protected from price gouging are mostly basic household items that families regularly need. Some of the items that are specifically listed under the law include:

  • Food and drink
  • Pet food
  • Toiletries
  • Emergency supplies
  • Diapers
  • Batteries
  • Radios
  • Medical supplies
  • Construction materials
  • Oils and gasoline

Services that could be essential to recovering from a disaster are also protected from price gouging. Some of these services include:

  • Transportation
  • Storage
  • Towing
  • Building repairs
  • Hotel rates

Prices of these goods and services can legally be raised slightly to reflect shortages or an increase in the cost of labor during the emergency. In these instances, the seller or service provider will have to prove that the increased prices were necessary.

The Consequences Of Price Gouging

Penal Code 396 makes the act of price gouging a misdemeanor offense. Any seller or service provider who is caught price gouging their customers will face misdemeanor charges. The penalties for this crime are:

  • Up to 1 year in jail.
  • A max fine of $10,000.

How To Deal With Price Gouging?

Price gouging is monitored and enforced by the California Attorney General and local district attorneys. If a person suspects that they are dealing with price gouging, then they should report the incident to their local district attorney’s office or go to the California Attorney General’s website where there is a form that can be filled out online.

During a state of emergency, such as a global pandemic, no one should have to deal with increased prices on necessary goods and services just so one bad person can make a quick buck. This is why price gouging is a crime here in the state of California.

What are your thoughts on price gouging and California’s law against it?

Is it a good idea to protect people during times of emergency? Is the punishment for the crime appropriate? Let us know what you think in the comments down below.

 

What Is A Bail Bond?

What Is A Bail Bond?

What Is A Bail Bond?

Bail isn’t something that most people deal with on a daily basis. In fact, some people are able to go their entire lives without having to worry about bail. However, not everyone is so lucky. Sometimes, when you least expect it, someone you care about gets arrested. When that happens you want to help them out, but have no idea how.

You find yourself looking at bail agents or bail bondsmen, wondering what the heck a bail bond even is. Luckily, a bail bond is very simple to understand, and the people working at David Ortiz Bail Bonds in Tulare will be more than happy to help you.

We provide FREE consultations to any Californians looking to post bail.

In its simplest form, a bail bond is an agreement between a bail agent and their client. The bail agent agrees to pay the full cost of the bail for their client. In return, the client only has to pay a percentage of that bail amount to the agent as payment for the service. Here at David Ortiz Bail Bonds in Tulare, we only charge 10% of the bail amount, which means you get a 90% discount off the price of the bail.

With a bail bond, you don’t have to pay the full bail amount, and you don’t have to pay it off all at once. At David Ortiz Bail Bonds in Tulare, we provide our clients with personalized payment plans. This way, the cost of the bail bond is broken up over several monthly payments, making it much more affordable for our clients.

Some of the other features we provide for our clients include:

  • 24/7 Bail Bond Service
  • FREE Consultation
  • 20% Discount
  • Phone approvals
  • 0% Interest Payment Plans
  • No Hidden Fees
  • No Collateral with Working Co-Signer
  • Se habla Español

If you have never bailed anyone out of jail before, talk to the bail agents at David Ortiz Bail Bonds in Tulare. They are some of the best in the state of California. They will answer all of your questions and walk you through each step of the bail bond process. On top of that, we will provide you with a much more affordable option for rescuing someone from jail. Call us today to learn more.

Are you ready to bail someone out of jail? If so, call David Ortiz Bail Bonds in Tulare at 1-866-485-6356 or 661-326-0608 or click Talk To An Agent Now to chat.

We Make Posting Bail Easy

We Make Posting Bail Easy

We Make Posting Bail Easy

When it comes to dealing with bail, a lot of people are caught off guard. For one thing, they didn’t expect anyone to get arrested. For another, they weren’t prepared for the cost. Bail, even at its cheapest, usually costs several thousands of dollars, putting it out of range for the average individual.

Luckily, paying for someone’s bail doesn’t have to be difficult. With help from David Ortiz Bail Bonds in Visalia, it can actually be easy. We know that life can be messy and unpredictable, which means making fixed regular payments can be tough for anyone. That is why we try to be more flexible with our payment plans.

Whenever someone comes to us for bail help, we create a personalized payment plan for them. This breaks up the cost of the bail bond and spreads it out over several months. By doing this, we make the cost of bailing someone out of jail much more manageable for our clients. In an effort to keep the cost low, we don’t even charge interest on our payment plans.

As we mentioned earlier, we try to be flexible with our clients and their payment plans. We know that sometimes things change and payments that were once manageable can become too expensive. If this happens, don’t panic. Just talk to one of our helpful bail agents. They will be more than happy to work with you.

Some of the other benefits we provide our clients with include:

  • 24/7 Bail Bond Service
  • FREE Consultation
  • 20% Discount
  • Phone approvals
  • 0% Interest Payment Plans
  • No Hidden Fees
  • No Collateral with Working Co-Signer
  • Se habla Español

If you want affordability and understanding while bailing someone out of jail, contact David Ortiz Bail Bonds in Visalia. Our bail agents are available 24/7 and will always be more than happy to answer your questions. You won’t find better bail help anywhere else in California. You can absolutely count on us to be there when you need help most.

Bail help is only a phone call away at David Ortiz Bail Bonds in Visalia, call 1-866-485-6356 or 661-326-0608 or click Talk To An Agent Now to chat.

What Are California’s Laws On Fighting In Public?

What Are California’s Laws On Fighting In Public?

What Are California’s Laws On Fighting In Public?

For the most part, people are able to go about their day without much confrontation. In most instances, people would rather things go smoothly than get into a fight. Unfortunately, there are still times when fights will arise. Often times, they occur because one, or both, of the parties involved is not in their usual state of mind.

Maybe one person is having a bad day or the other has been drinking. In those instances, the people are much easier to anger, and harder to calm down. What everyone needs to remember is that getting into a fight in public can have a lot of negative consequences. Aside from all of the physical injuries, a person could also get into legal trouble too.

Don’t Disturb The Peace

Fights are no fun, and can be very dangerous for everyone involved. This is why there are several laws against fighting here in California. If a person allows themselves to get caught up in a brawl, they could face several different charges.

The first charge that a person may face for fighting in public is under California Penal Code 415, which is the state’s disturbing the peace law. Under this law, it is illegal for a person to disturb someone else with loud music, offensive words or by starting a fight.

A few examples of breaking this law include:

  • Pointing a speaker at a neighbor’s house and playing loud music with the intent of annoying them.
  • Using offensive words or racial slurs to provoke another individual.
  • Starting a fight with another person while in a public place.

If a person does any of these, they are guilty of disturbing the peace. California Penal Code 415 is a wobbler offense, meaning that it can be charged either as an infraction or as a misdemeanor. As an infraction, a person will likely face a small fine. As a misdemeanor, a person will face:

  • Up to 90 days in jail.
  • A max fine of $400.

Assaulting Someone Is No Good

Next on the list of crimes that a person can be charged with for fighting is California Penal Code 240, California’s simple assault law. Under this law, it is illegal for an individual to willfully, violently hurt, or attempt to violently hurt, another individual. Some examples of this can include:

  • Throwing a drink in another person’s face.
  • Throwing rocks at another individual.
  • Trying to punch someone but missing.

California Penal Code 240 is a misdemeanor offense that comes with:

  • Up to 6 months in county jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.
  • Misdemeanor probation.

The consequences for assault can be doubled if the victim was someone who was currently working, such as:

  • A doctor or nurse providing emergency aide.
  • A firefighter.
  • A police officer.
  • An animal control officer.
  • An EMT.

If a deadly weapon is used, such as a knife, a gun or even a car, then a person will face charges under California Penal Code 245(a)(1), California’s assault with a deadly weapon law. Understandably, this law carries harsher consequences:

  • Up to 4 years in state prison.
  • A max fine of $10,000.
  • Felony probation.

Battery Is Even Worse

The next crimes that a person could be charged with for fighting is California Penal Code 242 or 243, California’s battery laws. Under these laws, it is illegal for a person to willfully use unlawful force against someone. If the person causes their victim pain, they will face charges under Penal Code 243. If they don’t cause pain, they will face charges under Penal Code 242.

The crime of battery differs from assault. Assault is primarily concerned with the person’s attempt to cause harm, whereas battery is concerned with the harm that was actually caused.

The penalties for Penal Code 242, simple battery or battery that didn’t cause harm, is a misdemeanor offense that comes with:

  • Up to 6 months in jail.
  • A max fine of $2,000.
  • Misdemeanor probation.

Battery that causes serious injuries on the victim is known as aggravated battery under Penal Code 243. This is a wobbler offense that can be charged as either a misdemeanor or a felony depending on the facts of the case. With this offense, a person can face anywhere from 1 year in a county jail up to 4 years in a state prison.

Just like with assault, the consequences of battery increase if the victim was an on duty:

  • Animal control officer
  • Doctor
  • EMT
  • Firefighter
  • Police officer

Don’t Start A Fight

Starting a fight is never a good idea. Not only will it leave a person with plenty of injuries, it could also get a person into some serious legal trouble. This is especially true if the victim in the incident was someone who was trying to do their job. Even if a person is having a bad day and someone is bugging them for whatever reason, the best thing to do is to take a deep breath and walk away. Doing that will have a much better outcome.

What do you think of California’s different laws surrounding fighting in public?

Do you think there are enough? Do the punishments fit the crimes? Is there anything you would change? Tell us what you think in the comments down below.

 

What Are Mandatory Reporting Laws?

What Are Mandatory Reporting Laws?

What Are Mandatory Reporting Laws?

Child abuse is a very serious offense that most people do not ignore. As soon as it is discovered that someone has hurt or abused a child, the authorities will be alerted. Then the accused person will be arrested and face criminal charges. More on that can be found here.

Hurting a child is cruel and so most people are against the act. If they think they are seeing signs of child abuse, they will likely report it to the proper authorities. What some people may not be aware of is that there are certain professions that are required by law to report suspected incidents of child abuse. Failing to do so can result in legal consequences.

Who Are Mandatory Reporters?

The state of California has a law known as Child Abuse and Neglect Reporting Act (CANRA). This law labels certain jobs as mandatory reporters. Some of the people who are mandatory reporters include:

  • Administrators and employees of youth programs
  • Child care employees
  • Child visitation monitors
  • Clergy members
  • Computer technicians
  • Doctors
  • Firefighters
  • Head start program teachers
  • Instructional aides
  • Police officers
  • Public assistance workers
  • Public school employees
  • School security
  • Social workers
  • Teacher’s aides
  • Teachers

This means that someone working in any of the above fields has to file a report of suspected child abuse or neglect of anyone under the age of 18, to local law enforcement and to social services within 36 hours of learning of the abuse. If a person in these fields suspects that a child is being abused or neglected, they have to file a report. If they fail to do that, then they could face legal consequences.

The Consequences Of Failing To Report

Mandatory reporters are meant to help keep kids safe. If they don’t properly file a report in a timely manner, a kid could get severely hurt, or even die. That is something that no one wants to happen.

When a person fails to file a report of suspected neglect or abuse, they will be charged with a misdemeanor offense. This means that they will face:

  • Up to 6 months in county jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.

If a person working in one of the professions listed under CANRA willfully chooses to not report suspected abuse or neglect, and the child dies or suffers great bodily harm, the person will face:

  • Up to 1 year in county jail.
  • A max fine of $5,000.

Reporting Could Save A Child

Children are very important for the future and they don’t always know how to ask for help. This means that adults need to be the ones to help kids out. This is what parents are supposed to do, but sometimes they are the ones causing the problem. When that is the case, it is up to mandatory reporters to come to the child’s rescue.

Due to this fact, it is very important that every mandatory reporter do their job and report incidents of abuse, or even suspected abuse. After all, it is often better to be safe, than sorry.

What do you think of California’s mandatory reporting laws?

Is it the right thing to do to force people to report suspected cases of abuse? What about the consequences for failing to report, are they fair? Let us know what you think in the comments down below.

 

Do You Know How To Handle Mountain Lions In California?

Do You Know How To Handle Mountain Lions In California?

Do You Know How To Handle Mountain Lions In California?

Despite how urbanized California is in some areas, there are still plenty of wild spaces out there. All sorts of animals live in these wild spaces and call California home just as much as people do. When these wild areas are close to human settlements, or when people go off exploring, there are bound to be interactions between people and animals.

Some of these critters are more dangerous than others, and so their interactions with people can be fine or dangerous. Recently, one family had a nasty scare with a mountain lion while they were visiting a wilderness park. The mountain lion attacked a young guest and then fled the scene.

Mountain Lion Attacks A Little Boy

A group of five, consisting of two adults and three children, were visiting Lake Forest in Orange County. As the guests were enjoying the park, a mountain lion singled out a three-year-old boy. The mountain lion attacked, grabbing the boy by his neck and attempted to drag him away. The boy’s father threw his backpack at the lion, which dropped the boy and ran off with the backpack instead.

The boy was taken to Mission Hospital where he was treated for puncture wounds and abrasions before being released in stable condition.

Meanwhile, the lion was later photographed up a tree, still clutching the father’s backpack. The park was evacuated and an hour later, local sheriff’s deputies were authorized to kill the lion. They are certain they got the correct lion because it was found in a tree with the backpack.

Can Mountain Lions Be Hunted?

Mountain lions are predators who are very good at hunting, which can make them scary. However, this state is still their home as much as it is to every other Californian. As such, mountain lions are a specially protected species under the passage of Proposition 117 in 1990.

Under this law, it is illegal for anyone to kill, injure, possess, transport, import or sell any mountain lion or parts of a mountain lion. Some exceptions are made for museums and scientific studies, but they need special permits issued by California Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Under three specific circumstances, a mountain lion can be killed. Those circumstances are:

  • A depredation permit is issued for a specific lion that is killing livestock and/or pets.
  • To preserve public safety.
  • To protect listed bighorn sheep.

In all of these instances, a person needs to acquire a permit from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. However, a permit is not required if the lion is attacking someone at that moment.

Illegally killing a mountain lion without a permit could earn a person some fines, jail time, community service, and even reparations if they apply.

Lion Attacks Are Rare

Everyone should remember that mountain lion attacks are rare. Mountain lions are cats, and like most cats, they prefer to be left alone. Many studies have shown that mountain lions who live near humans often remain unknown and unseen by their human neighbors. They rarely attack humans, and often only do so out of desperation or because of an illness such as rabies or feline leukemia.

According to the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, there have only been 16 verified mountain lion attacks on humans in California between 1890 and 2014. Of those 16, only six were fatal. That’s a lot of time for very few attacks. Statistically speaking, a person is more likely to be struck by lightning.

If a person wants to avoid encountering a mountain lion while exploring California’s wilderness, then they should stay in groups. As mentioned above, mountain lions prefer to avoid people, especially large groups of people. They should also make plenty of noise to avoid accidentally surprising a mountain lion.

As with any wildlife, do not approach a mountain lion, especially if it is feeding young. Never corner a lion, always give it an escape route. Stay calm, move slowly, and speak firmly. Never run or kneel near a lion, instead back away slowly and keep your eyes on the cat at all times. Try to appear bigger by raising your arms and holding open a jacket if you are wearing one. Try to give the lion the impression that you are not a prey. Lions don’t want to attack something that might fight back and hurt them.

What do you think about California’s decision to make mountain lions a protected species?

Let us know what you think in the comments down below.

 

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